An analysis of the process and effects of the biomedical journals disclosure of the potential confli

A total of citations were screened, potentially eligible full articles were retrieved, and 37 studies met our inclusion criteria. The main outcomes were the prevalence of specific types of industry relationships, the relation between industry sponsorship and study outcome or investigator behavior, and the process for disclosure, review, and management of financial conflicts of interest. Eight articles, which together evaluated original studies, assessed the relation between industry sponsorship and outcome in original research. Aggregating the results of these articles showed a statistically significant association between industry sponsorship and pro-industry conclusions pooled Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio, 3.

An analysis of the process and effects of the biomedical journals disclosure of the potential confli

Received Oct 31; Accepted Jan This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Abstract Conflicts of interest held by researchers remain a focus of attention in clinical research. Biases related to these relationships have the potential to directly impact the quality of healthcare by influencing decision-making, yet conflicts of interest remain underreported, inconsistently described, and difficult to access.

Initiatives aimed at improving the disclosure of researcher conflicts of interest are still in their infancy but represent a vital reform that must be addressed before potential biases associated with conflicts of interest can be mitigated and trust in the impartiality of clinical evidence restored.

In this review, we examine the prevalence of conflicts of interest, evidence of the effects that disclosed and undisclosed conflicts of interest have had on the reporting of clinical evidence, and the emerging approaches for improving the completeness and consistency of disclosures.

Through this review of emerging technologies, we recognize a growing interest in publicly accessible registries for researcher conflicts of interest and propose five desiderata aimed at maximizing the value of such registries: Journal Editor, Accessible Registry, Financial Conflict, Physician Payment, Prospective Registration Background For researchers, conflicts of interest describe situations where the impartiality of research may be compromised because the researcher stands to profit in some way from the conclusions they draw [ 1 ].

The clearest and most often discussed example of a conflict of interest in biomedical research involves doing research on a specific intervention while receiving research funding or personal remuneration from the company producing that intervention. While there are many other forms of financial and non-financial conflicts of interests [ 2 ], this is the type that is most often measured and discussed.

In practice, every researcher holds a set of interests—financial, personal, ideological, or otherwise—which may lead to bias in the context of specific research. The topic of disclosing conflicts of interest has been debated since the s [ 3 ], with disagreements about whether or not conflicts of interest should be disclosed and whether methods of peer review are sufficient for mitigating the potential for bias associated with research undertaken by researchers who hold conflicts of interest.

The lack of transparency in the disclosure of conflicts of interest is a problem in biomedical research because it hinders our ability to mitigate the risk of bias. These biases, when hidden, can affect clinical decision-making by making interventions appear safer or more effective than they really are.

High-profile examples where undisclosed conflicts of interest have clearly affected clinical practice may have contributed to the erosion of public trust in biomedical research and peer review processes [ 9 — 14 ]. New methods for further improving the completeness and consistency with which researchers disclose their conflicts of interest are now needed to support mitigation and increase trust in peer-reviewed research.

In this review, we provide a narrative review of studies that have measured the prevalence of disclosed and undisclosed conflicts of interest, summarize what is and what is not known about associations between conflicts of interest and biased reporting, describe some of the pertinent examples of where conflicts of interest appear to have affected the presentation of clinical evidence or public opinion, and discuss some recent and emerging approaches aimed at improving the accuracy and completeness of disclosures [ 61516 ].

Conflicts of interest are common and underreported Studies measuring the incidence of disclosed and undisclosed conflicts of interest have to date been generally small, heterogeneous in terms of setting and outcomes, and often focused largely on the subset of conflicts of interest that are financial in nature.

In a systematic review of the prevalence of conflicts of interest, Bekelman et al. However, these values are not directly comparable because the studies involve different types of conflicts of interests and data sources and are restricted to specific financial conflicts of interests and the study sizes are relatively small.

Conflicts of interest appear to be even more rarely reported in science journalism. A study showed that very few newspaper stories about scientific research report the financial ties of researchers and quoted sources, even when the conflicts of interest are disclosed in the journal article [ 8 ].ABSTRACT: It is common practice for biomedical journals to disclose potential conflicts of interest (CoI).

Background

The importance of this is to determine author characteristics related to CoI. This is done using calculative methods where author names are submitted to patent or to report compensatio.

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An analysis of the process and effects of the biomedical journals disclosure of the potential confli

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