Railroad strike of 1877

That year the country was in the fourth year of a prolonged economic depression after the panic of Railway work was already poorly paid and dangerous. Moreover, the railroad companies had taken advantage of the economic troubles to largely break the nascent trade unions that had been formed by the workers before and after the American Civil War. Mathews dispatched the militia when police were unable to break up the supportive crowd that had gathered.

Railroad strike of 1877

He served as governor of Ohio from In Julya national railroad strike spread to the state of Ohio.

Railroad strike of 1877

Young addressed the strike in Ohio by using the state militia. Young restored order in Ohio, but he was unable to address many of the issues that had caused the strike.

After leaving the governorship, Young was elected to the United States House of Representatives for two terms and served from to The strikers refused to let the trains run until the most recent pay cut was returned to the employees. West Virginia's governor quickly called out the state's militia.

Militia members, for the most part, sympathized with the workers and refused to intervene, prompting the governor to request federal government assistance. Hayes sent federal troops to several locations to reopen the railroads.

In the meantime, the strike had spread to several other states, including Maryland, where violence erupted in Baltimore between the strikers and that state's militia. In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and St. Louis, Missouri, strikers temporarily gained control of the cities until federal soldiers reestablished order.

In Chicago, Illinois, more than twenty-thousand people rallied in support of the strikers. The strike also affected Ohioans.

Governor Thomas Young encouraged Ohioans to form private police forces to defend businesses from strikers. He also dispatched the Ohio militia to several locations to maintain law and order. In Columbus, mobs attacked and destroyed much railroad property. Protests in Zanesville, Lancaster, and Steubenville also briefly shut down rail service.

On July 18,strikers blockaded the railroad, refusing to let any trains to pass.

The Great Railway Strike of spread quickly within the region of the eastern railroads, but as the strikers and their sympathizers gathered in Baltimore, they assumed a scale few Americans expected. Railroad Strike of The depression of the s forced the American railroads into a cost-cutting mode. The workers for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad went on strike in after receiving a second pay cut within a short period of time. The strike began in Martinsburg, West Virginia, on July 16, , after workers of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad were informed that their pay would be cut 10 percent. Workers grumbled about the loss of income in small groups, and by the end of the day railroad firemen began walking off the job.

Governor Young quickly dispatched militia forces to the city, hoping to avoid violence. The Great Railroad Strike was typical of most strikes during this era. The availability of laborers and government support for businesses limited workers' ability to gain concessions from their employers.The Great Railroad Strike Of was a semi-spontaneous movement aimed at restoring a wage cut which began on July 26, along the Baltimore & Ohio.

While the movement ultimately failed it spawned a labor uprising which led to the contemporary unions of today. Railroad Strike of The depression of the s forced the American railroads into a cost-cutting mode.

The workers for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad went on strike in after receiving a second pay cut within a short period of time. The Great Railroad Strike of , sometimes referred to as the Great Upheaval, began on July 14 in Martinsburg, West Virginia, United States after the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O) cut wages for the third time in a year.

This strike finally ended some 45 days later, after it was put down by local and state militias, and federal troops.

The Great Railroad Strike of was the country's first major rail strike and witnessed the first general strike in the nation's history.

The strikes and the violence it spawned briefly paralyzed the country's commerce and led governors in ten states to mobilize 60, militia members to reopen rail traffic.

Strikers in Pittsburgh taunting National Guard troops, July, As darkness fell over the city of Pittsburgh on July 21, , an enormous glow illuminated the sky. The Pennsylvania Railroad's (PRR) massive railroad yards were engulfed by a sea of fire. Railroad Strike of The depression of the s forced the American railroads into a cost-cutting mode.

Railroad strike of 1877

The workers for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad went on strike in after receiving a second pay cut within a short period of time.

Great Railroad Strike of | History, Facts, & Significance | timberdesignmag.com